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Basic Rights (4)+

Documentation for Employment (1)+

  • Background Checks: What Job Applicants and Employees Should Know

    The new brochure, Background Checks: What Employers Need to Know, offers nuts-and-bolts guidance from the two agencies when employers consider the background of applicants and employees in hiring, retention, promotion, and reassignment. > Questions About Your Background > Background Reports > If the Employer Finds Something Negative in Your Background > Where to Go For Help Content Detail

    By:
    Federal Trade Commission (FTC)

Ending a Job (2)+

  • Ending a Job

    This document discusses the following questions: What happens if you are fired or laid off from your job or if you quit? What happens if you become ill or are injured and cannot work? What is sick leave and how is it covered? What happens when you retire? What is a pension? What is Social Security? The document is an excerpt from An Introduction to Law in Georgia, Fourth Edition, published by the Carl Vinson Institute of Government, 1998 (updated 2004). Read More

    By:
    Carl Vinson Institute
    Read this in:
    Spanish / Español
  • What to Do If You Lose Your Job

    Explains "at will" employment and basic requirements for receiving unemployment benefits in Georgia. Content Detail

    Read this in:
    Spanish / Español

Finding a Job (2)+

  • Background Checks: What Job Applicants and Employees Should Know

    The new brochure, Background Checks: What Employers Need to Know, offers nuts-and-bolts guidance from the two agencies when employers consider the background of applicants and employees in hiring, retention, promotion, and reassignment. > Questions About Your Background > Background Reports > If the Employer Finds Something Negative in Your Background > Where to Go For Help Content Detail

    By:
    Federal Trade Commission (FTC)
  • Getting a Job

    This document discusses basic employment issues relating to getting a job, including laws governing hiring such as equal employment opportunity, non-discrimination, and equal pay requirements, excerpted from An Introduction to Law in Georgia, Fourth Edition, published by the Carl Vinson Institute of Government, 1998 (updated 2004). Read More

    By:
    Carl Vinson Institute
    Read this in:
    Spanish / Español

Wage and Labor Law (4)+

  • Background Checks: What Job Applicants and Employees Should Know

    The new brochure, Background Checks: What Employers Need to Know, offers nuts-and-bolts guidance from the two agencies when employers consider the background of applicants and employees in hiring, retention, promotion, and reassignment. > Questions About Your Background > Background Reports > If the Employer Finds Something Negative in Your Background > Where to Go For Help Content Detail

    By:
    Federal Trade Commission (FTC)
  • Get Information About Child Labor

    Today, approximately 80% of all students will work sometime during high school. Child labor laws ensure our youth will have the necessary time to pursue their education and be employed in a safe workplace. Georgia's child labor law was written in 1878 whereas the federal child labor law is provided for under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) enacted in 1938. When there are differences between federal and state laws pertaining to child labor, the law providing the more stringent standard is observed. Content Detail

    By:
    Georgia Department of Labor
  • Household Workers

    If you hire someone to work in your home, such as a cleaning person, a cook, a gardener or a baby sitter, both you and your employee should know about paying Social Security and Medicare taxes. Your household employee may be eligible for Social Security and Medicare some day—if you deduct Social Security and Medicare taxes from his or her wages, pay the taxes to the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) and report the wages to the Social Security Administration. Content Detail

    By:
    Social Security Administration
    Read this in:
    Spanish / Español
    Polish / Język Polski
    Chinese / 中文
  • Minimum Wage Requirements and Labor Standards

    This web site contains a series of "Fact Sheets" that provide information about minimum wage requirements, the way the Fair Labor Standards Act to different kinds of work, the Family Medical Leave Act and other laws that apply to workers. The web site is sponsored by the US Department of Labor, Administrative Standards, Wage and Hour Division. Content Detail

    By:
    U.S. Department of Labor, Wage & Hour Division

Work and Public Benefits (4)+

  • If You Lose Your Job

    This brochure will give you information on unemployment benefits, unemployment insurance appeals and ideas about other ways to replace lost income while you look for another job or wait for your unemployment benefits. Content Detail

    By:
    Georgia Legal Services Program®
  • Social Security No-Match Letters: Questions and Answers for Workers

    This Q&A addresses frequently asked questions about workers' rights when their employer receives a Social-Security no-match letter. Please consult an attorney to get an evaluation of your claims. The document is PDF format. Content Detail

    By:
    National Employment Law Project (NELP)
  • TANF: What Happens When I Go to Work?

    This document describes the different kinds of support services that families receiving TANF can get when the head of the household goes to work, such as child care, Medicaid health benefits and help with transportation. The document also describes what you can do if you do not get the support services you have asked for. Read More

    By:
    Georgia Legal Services Program®
  • Work and Public Housing and TANF Benefits

    Information on public housing policies which encourage tenants to work. Read More

    By:
    Georgia Legal Services Program®

Banking (1)+

  • Ways to receive your money (Wages or Payments)

    Have you received a paycheck but aren’t sure whether to cash it or put it into a bank account? This guide provides information about receiving wages or payments. You can use this guide to compare the benefits and risks of getting paid in cash, with a check, by direct deposit, or on a card. Content Detail

    By:
    Federal Trade Commission (FTC)
    Read this in:
    Spanish / Español

Privacy (1)+

  • Drug Testing and Privacy at Work

    This document discusses the basic employment laws relating to drug testing and privacy at work, excerpted from An Introduction to Law in Georgia, Fourth Edition, published by the Carl Vinson Institute of Government, 1998 (updated 2004). Read More

    By:
    Carl Vinson Institute
    Read this in:
    Spanish / Español

Know Your Rights Articles (23)+

  • Background Checks: What Job Applicants and Employees Should Know

    The new brochure, Background Checks: What Employers Need to Know, offers nuts-and-bolts guidance from the two agencies when employers consider the background of applicants and employees in hiring, retention, promotion, and reassignment. > Questions About Your Background > Background Reports > If the Employer Finds Something Negative in Your Background > Where to Go For Help Content Detail

    By:
    Federal Trade Commission (FTC)
  • Checklist for Wage and Hour Claims

    This is a checklist for identifying common Fair Labor Standards Act claims for low wage workers. Please consult an attorney to get an evaluation of your claims. The document is PDF format. Content Detail

    By:
    National Employment Law Project (NHELP)
  • Day Laborers' Rights under Federal Law: Waiting Time and Deductions from Wage.

    This fact sheet covers workers' rights to compensation for waiting time and the legality of common paycheck deductions under federal law. Please consult an attorney to get an evaluation of your claims. The document is PDF format. Content Detail

    By:
    National Employment Law Project (NELP)
  • Drug Testing and Privacy at Work

    This document discusses the basic employment laws relating to drug testing and privacy at work, excerpted from An Introduction to Law in Georgia, Fourth Edition, published by the Carl Vinson Institute of Government, 1998 (updated 2004). Read More

    By:
    Carl Vinson Institute
    Read this in:
    Spanish / Español
  • Employer Responsibilities for Worker Safety

    Employers have certain responsibilities under the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970. This web site contains a summary of the most important ones. Content Detail

    By:
    U.S. Department of Labor Occupational Safety & Health Administration
    Read this in:
    Spanish / Español
  • Get Information About Child Labor

    Today, approximately 80% of all students will work sometime during high school. Child labor laws ensure our youth will have the necessary time to pursue their education and be employed in a safe workplace. Georgia's child labor law was written in 1878 whereas the federal child labor law is provided for under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) enacted in 1938. When there are differences between federal and state laws pertaining to child labor, the law providing the more stringent standard is observed. Content Detail

    By:
    Georgia Department of Labor
  • Household Workers

    If you hire someone to work in your home, such as a cleaning person, a cook, a gardener or a baby sitter, both you and your employee should know about paying Social Security and Medicare taxes. Your household employee may be eligible for Social Security and Medicare some day—if you deduct Social Security and Medicare taxes from his or her wages, pay the taxes to the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) and report the wages to the Social Security Administration. Content Detail

    By:
    Social Security Administration
    Read this in:
    Spanish / Español
    Polish / Język Polski
    Chinese / 中文
  • If You Are Self-Employed

    Most people who pay into Social Security work for an employer. Their employer deducts Social Security taxes from their paycheck, matches that contribution and sends taxes to the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) and reports wages to Social Security. But self-employed people must report their earnings and pay their taxes directly to IRS. Content Detail

    By:
    Social Security Administration
    Read this in:
    Spanish / Español
    Russian / Pусский
    Chinese / 中文
  • Job Training Programs Through the US Department of Labor

    The Department of Labor's Employment & Training Administration (ETA) funds job training programs to improve the employment prospects of adults, youth, and dislocated workers. These programs are delivered primarily by states through the One-Stop Career Center System. Training programs can vary from state to state depending on the skills that are needed to compete for jobs in the local area. However, all programs are aimed at boosting workers' employability and earnings. Content Detail

    By:
    United States Department of Labor
  • Minimum Wage Facts

    Questions and answers about the federal minimum wage. Content Detail

    By:
    U.S. Department of Labor
  • Minimum Wage Requirements and Labor Standards

    This web site contains a series of "Fact Sheets" that provide information about minimum wage requirements, the way the Fair Labor Standards Act to different kinds of work, the Family Medical Leave Act and other laws that apply to workers. The web site is sponsored by the US Department of Labor, Administrative Standards, Wage and Hour Division. Content Detail

    By:
    U.S. Department of Labor, Wage & Hour Division
  • Off to Work: What You Need to Know about Documents, Wages, and Taxes

    This web page contains information about documents that allow you to work in the United States, employee status, taxes, hourly wages and other items that affect the pay you receive. Content Detail

    By:
    Georgia Legal Services Program®
  • OSHA Fact Sheets - Information from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration

    This web page contains links to fact sheets developed by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration relating to employee rights. Content Detail

    By:
    U.S. Department of Labor - Occupational Safety and Health Administration
  • OSHA - Occupational Safety and Health Administration

    In general, the Act covers all employers and their employees in the 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and other U.S. territories. Coverage is provided either directly by the federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) or by an OSHA‑approved state job safety and health plan. Employees of the U.S. Postal Service also are covered. Content Detail

    By:
    U.S. Department of Labor- Occupational Safety and Health Administration
    Read this in:
    Spanish / Español
  • Rights Begin at Home: Protecting Yourself as a Domestic Worker

    This handbook informs domestic workers about their rights under the law and offers advice on how to improve their wages and working conditions. Please consult an attorney to get an evaluation of your claims. The document is PDF format. Content Detail

    By:
    National Employment Law Project (NELP)
    Read this in:
    Spanish / Español
  • Social Security No-Match Letters: Questions and Answers for Workers

    This Q&A addresses frequently asked questions about workers' rights when their employer receives a Social-Security no-match letter. Please consult an attorney to get an evaluation of your claims. The document is PDF format. Content Detail

    By:
    National Employment Law Project (NELP)
  • Tax Information for Small Businesses and the Self-Employed

    This section offers a broad range of resources across federal and state agencies, as well as industry/profession specific information for self-employed entrepreneurs, employers and businesses. The "Quick Links" section will provide you with fast access to general business topics. You may also order the Small Business/Self Employed Tax Calendar, Introduction to Federal Taxes CD-ROM, Virtual Small Business Workshop CD-ROM, and the Small Business Resource Guide CD-ROM online. Content Detail

    By:
    Internal Revenue Service
    Read this in:
    Spanish / Español
  • The Minimum Wage

    These web pages contain information on the federal minimum wage. Content Detail

    By:
    U.S. Department of Labor, Wage & Hour Division
  • Ways to receive your money (Wages or Payments)

    Have you received a paycheck but aren’t sure whether to cash it or put it into a bank account? This guide provides information about receiving wages or payments. You can use this guide to compare the benefits and risks of getting paid in cash, with a check, by direct deposit, or on a card. Content Detail

    By:
    Federal Trade Commission (FTC)
    Read this in:
    Spanish / Español
  • Whistleblower Rights

    Provides basic information on laws that protect whistle-blowers. Content Detail

    By:
    U.S. Department of Labor - Occupational Safety and Health Administration
    Read this in:
    Spanish / Español
  • Worker Health and Safety Information

    This page details how OSHA- the Occupational Safety and Health Administration- applies to workers Content Detail

    By:
    DOL Occupational Safety & Health Administration
    Read this in:
    Spanish / Español
  • Worker Rights under the Occupational Safety and Health Act

    You have the right to a safe workplace. OSHA requires employers to provide a workplace that is free of serious recognized hazards and in compliance with OSHA standards. Content Detail

    By:
    U.S. Department of Labor - Occupational Safety and Health Administration
    Read this in:
    Spanish / Español
  • Your Rights and Duties on the Job

    Your basic rights and duties on the job. Read More

    By:
    Carl Vinson Institute
    Read this in:
    Spanish / Español