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Civil Cases (8)+

  • Getting Ready for Court

    This video explains what you can expect when going to court and how you can prepare. It will review what to wear, preparing documents, child care, who to bring with you, getting to court and going through security, mediation, and how to behave during the hearing. Read More

  • How Civil Lawsuits Work: After the Trial

    This document describes the basic process of what happens after a civil law suit ends. The document has been excerpted from An Introduction to Law in Georgia, Fourth Edition, published by the Carl Vinson Institute of Government, 1998 (updated 2004). Read More

    By:
    Carl Vinson Institute
    Read this in:
    Spanish / Español
  • How Civil Lawsuits Work: Before the Trial

    This document describes the basic process for what happens before the trial in a civil law suit. The document has been excerpted from An Introduction to Law in Georgia, Fourth Edition, published by the Carl Vinson Institute of Government, 1998 (updated 2004). Read More

    By:
    Carl Vinson Institute
    Read this in:
    Spanish / Español
  • How Civil Lawsuits Work: The Trial

    This document describes the basic process of what happens during a civil law suit. The document has been excerpted from An Introduction to Law in Georgia, Third Edition, published by the Carl Vinson Institute of Government, 1998 (updated 2001). Read More

    By:
    Carl Vinson Institute
    Read this in:
    Spanish / Español
  • How Courts Work in Civil Cases

    This pamphlet describes step by step how courts work in civil cases (filing the complaint or petition, serving the complaint on the defendant, filing an answer, discovery and collection of evidence, hearing or trial, court decision, appeal and collection of judgment). Read More

  • How to Be a Good Witness - State Bar of Georgia Consumer Pamphlet

    You have a very important job to do as a witness in a lawsuit. Your role is not only important to the party for whom you appear and yourself, but also for the American system of justice. For a jury or judge to make a correct and wise decision, they must decide on facts stated by witnesses who have sworn to tell the truth. Understanding what you are expected to do and how to do it will ease your anxiety and make you a better witness. Content Detail

    By:
    State Bar of Georgia
  • How to Sue in Magistrate Court

    Magistrate Courts let you sue for money claims under $15,000 (fifteen thousand dollars). A Magistrate Judge decides your case after a trial. There is no jury. You do not need a lawyer. However, you may seek help from a lawyer. Content Detail

    Read this in:
    Spanish / Español
  • Military Law: An Overview

    All persons serving in the Armed Forces of the United States are subject to military law at all times. This web site contains a brief overview of military law and links to the sources of military law. Content Detail

    By:
    Cornell Legal Information Institute

Court System Overview (4)+

  • Getting Ready for Court

    This video explains what you can expect when going to court and how you can prepare. It will review what to wear, preparing documents, child care, who to bring with you, getting to court and going through security, mediation, and how to behave during the hearing. Read More

  • The Courts, Part 1: An Overview of Courts and Legal Disputes

    This document discusses why you might need to go to court and what a court is. It also discusses the two general kinds of disputes courts are asked to decide - civil and criminal disputes. This document is excerpted from An Introduction to Law in Georgia, Fourth Edition, published by the Carl Vinson Institute of Government, 1998 (updated 2004). Read More

    By:
    Carl Vinson Institute
    Read this in:
    Spanish / Español
  • The Courts, Part 3: How Courts Work and Make Laws

    This document discusses what judges and juries do. It also discusses how courts make and change laws. This document is excerpted from An Introduction to Law in Georgia, Fourth Edition, published by the Carl Vinson Institute of Government, 1998 (updated 2004). Read More

    By:
    Carl Vinson Institute
    Read this in:
    Spanish / Español
  • The Courts, Part 2: Which Court Can Hear Your Case?

    This document discusses the two general types of jurisdiction that courts must have in order to have the authority to hear a case. It also explains the Georgia court system and the federal court system. This document is excerpted from An Introduction to Law in Georgia, Fourth Edition, published by the Carl Vinson Institute of Government, 1998 (updated 2004). Read More

    By:
    Carl Vinson Institute
    Read this in:
    Spanish / Español

Georgia State Court System (1)+

  • How to Be a Good Witness - State Bar of Georgia Consumer Pamphlet

    You have a very important job to do as a witness in a lawsuit. Your role is not only important to the party for whom you appear and yourself, but also for the American system of justice. For a jury or judge to make a correct and wise decision, they must decide on facts stated by witnesses who have sworn to tell the truth. Understanding what you are expected to do and how to do it will ease your anxiety and make you a better witness. Content Detail

    By:
    State Bar of Georgia

Know Your Rights Articles (1)+

  • Learn about Civil Justice and the Legal System

    This presentation was developed as part of the Law and Government Education Project in the Institute of Government at the University of Georgia. In partnership with the Law School and the Center for Teaching and Learning at UGA and the Law School at Mercer University, the Institute develops resources on basic areas of Georgia and federal law. These resources are then distributed across the state in a variety of ways including the State Bar of Georgia?s Pro Bono Project website. We hope you will find this presentation to be useful and informative. Please be advised, however, that this presentation is designed to provide general information only and does not substitute for legal advice. At the conclusion of the presentation you will find a list of organizations which may be able to provide assistance to those who have legal issues relevant to the topic of this presentation. We encourage viewers to contact these organizations for help. Also, please consult the Pro Bono Project website for a list of other presentations available for viewing. Content Detail

    Read this in:
    Spanish / Español