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Civil Cases (13)+

  • Civil Court Cases

    This web page explains the process for a civil court case and describes some of the documents and concepts that are involved in the process, including : (1) the complaint or petition, (2) serving the complaint or petition on the opposing party, (3) use of blank or standard forms, (3) jurisdiction, (4) answering the complaint or petition, (5) hiring an attorney, (6) getting free or reduced-cost legal assistance, (7) getting a waiver of court costs, (8) trial calendars, (9) witnesses, (10) getting a continuance (a delay in the court case), and (11) the final judgment or final order. Content Detail

    By:
    Georgia Administrative Office of the Courts
  • Court Rules

    This link will take you to the court rules for each level of the Georgia Courts-- the Supreme Court and Court of Appeals, Superior, State, Juvenile, 
Probate, Magistrate, and Municipal Courts. If you can't afford a lawyer and you have to represent yourself in court ("pro se"), you must read the rules for the court. You will be expected to follow the rules that apply to "parties" to the action. Content Detail

    By:
    The Administrative Office of the Courts of Georgia
  • Getting Ready for Court

    This video explains what you can expect when going to court and how you can prepare. It will review what to wear, preparing documents, child care, who to bring with you, getting to court and going through security, mediation, and how to behave during the hearing. Read More

    By:
    Atlanta Legal Aid Society Inc
  • How Civil Lawsuits Work: After the Trial

    This document describes the basic process of what happens after a civil law suit ends. The document has been excerpted from An Introduction to Law in Georgia, Fourth Edition, published by the Carl Vinson Institute of Government, 1998 (updated 2004). Read More

    Read this in:
    Spanish / Español
  • How Civil Lawsuits Work: Before the Trial

    This document describes the basic process for what happens before the trial in a civil law suit. The document has been excerpted from An Introduction to Law in Georgia, Fourth Edition, published by the Carl Vinson Institute of Government, 1998 (updated 2004). Read More

    Read this in:
    Spanish / Español
  • How Civil Lawsuits Work: The Trial

    This document describes the basic process of what happens during a civil law suit. The document has been excerpted from An Introduction to Law in Georgia, Third Edition, published by the Carl Vinson Institute of Government, 1998 (updated 2001). Read More

    Read this in:
    Spanish / Español
  • How Courts Work

    Law and the courts are everywhere—on the front page news, in best-selling thrillers, on Court TV and network shows about lawyers. Famous trials are a great subject, full of human drama, but how many of us really understand the work that courts do and how they operate? Here’s a quick primer, with links that will help you go more deeply into the subject.: (1) Courts and Legal Procedure, (2) Steps in a Trial, (3) The Human Side of Being a Judge, (4) Mediation Content Detail

    By:
    American Bar Association
  • How to Be a Good Witness - State Bar of Georgia Consumer Pamphlet

    You have a very important job to do as a witness in a lawsuit. Your role is not only important to the party for whom you appear and yourself, but also for the American system of justice. For a jury or judge to make a correct and wise decision, they must decide on facts stated by witnesses who have sworn to tell the truth. Understanding what you are expected to do and how to do it will ease your anxiety and make you a better witness. Content Detail

    By:
    State Bar of Georgia
  • How to Sue in Magistrate Court

    Magistrate Courts let you sue for money claims under $15,000 (fifteen thousand dollars). A Magistrate Judge decides your case after a trial. There is no jury. You do not need a lawyer. However, you may seek help from a lawyer. Content Detail

    By:
    Atlanta Legal Aid Society Inc
    Read this in:
    Spanish / Español
  • Learn about Civil Justice and the Legal System

    This presentation was developed as part of the Law and Government Education Project in the Institute of Government at the University of Georgia. In partnership with the Law School and the Center for Teaching and Learning at UGA and the Law School at Mercer University, the Institute develops resources on basic areas of Georgia and federal law. These resources are then distributed across the state in a variety of ways including the State Bar of Georgia?s Pro Bono Project website. We hope you will find this presentation to be useful and informative. Please be advised, however, that this presentation is designed to provide general information only and does not substitute for legal advice. At the conclusion of the presentation you will find a list of organizations which may be able to provide assistance to those who have legal issues relevant to the topic of this presentation. We encourage viewers to contact these organizations for help. Also, please consult the Pro Bono Project website for a list of other presentations available for viewing. Content Detail

    Read this in:
    Spanish / Español
  • Military Law: An Overview

    All persons serving in the Armed Forces of the United States are subject to military law at all times. This web site contains a brief overview of military law and links to the sources of military law. Content Detail

    By:
    Cornell Legal Information Institute
  • Military Law Research Links

    This website contains links that are useful for understanding military law and the court system, for resolving legal issues and finding source documents. Content Detail

    By:
    Military Times Media Group

Georgia State Court System (18)+

  • Answering a Claim in Magistrate Court - A Short Video Presentation

    A defendant has 30 days after service to answer a claim in Magistrate Court. He or she may deny the claim and request a hearing or consent to the claim and set up payments. Content Detail

    By:
    Council Of Magistrate Court Judges
  • Communicating with the Court

    To make your relations with court personnel go as smoothly as possible, it's helpful to understand their responsibilities. Content Detail

    By:
    Council Of Magistrate Court Judges
  • Court Procedures in Magistrate Court - A Short Video Presentation

    Before your trial begins, Magistrate Courts will require that you talk with the other side to see if your dispute can be settled. The law requires that you at least make a reasonable effort to resolve the dispute before trial. Remember that once this opportunity has passed, the ultimate resolution of the matter will lie with the court. Content Detail

    By:
    Council Of Magistrate Court Judges
  • Court Rules

    This link will take you to the court rules for each level of the Georgia Courts-- the Supreme Court and Court of Appeals, Superior, State, Juvenile, 
Probate, Magistrate, and Municipal Courts. If you can't afford a lawyer and you have to represent yourself in court ("pro se"), you must read the rules for the court. You will be expected to follow the rules that apply to "parties" to the action. Content Detail

    By:
    The Administrative Office of the Courts of Georgia
  • Default Judgments - A Short Video Presentation

    If a defendant fails to file an answer to a claim within thirty days after being served and does not reopen the case within another 15 days, or if the defendant does not show up for trial, he or she will automatically lose the case by Default Judgment. Content Detail

    By:
    Council Of Magistrate Court Judges
  • Filing a Claim in Magistrate Court - A Short Video Presentation

    Before filing a claim in Magistrate Court, you'll want to consider whether or not the defendant will have the economic resources to collect should you be awarded a judgment... Content Detail

    By:
    Council Of Magistrate Court Judges
  • Georgia Court Rules

    These web pages provide the court rules for the following Georgia Courts: Supreme Court, Court of Appeals, Superior Court, State Court, Juvenile Court, Probate Court, and Magistrate Court Content Detail

    By:
    Georgia Administrative Office of the Courts
  • How to Be a Good Witness - State Bar of Georgia Consumer Pamphlet

    You have a very important job to do as a witness in a lawsuit. Your role is not only important to the party for whom you appear and yourself, but also for the American system of justice. For a jury or judge to make a correct and wise decision, they must decide on facts stated by witnesses who have sworn to tell the truth. Understanding what you are expected to do and how to do it will ease your anxiety and make you a better witness. Content Detail

    By:
    State Bar of Georgia
  • Juror's Manual - State Bar of Georgia Consumer Pamphlet

    The purpose of this brochure is to provide people who are going to serve on a jury with general background information which will hopefully lead to a clearer understanding and better appreciation of the judicial process. Content Detail

    By:
    State Bar of Georgia
  • Other Considerations Before Bringing a Case to Magistrate Court - A Short Video Presentation

    Before filing a criminal or civil case in Magistrate Court, it is wise to consider whether you have sufficient evidence to win your case... Content Detail

    By:
    Council Of Magistrate Court Judges
  • Should I be Represented by a Lawyer? A Short Video Presentation

    Persons appearing in court without a lawyer are called pro se litigants. In an effort to make the Magistrate Court user-friendly, hearings are usually conducted in an informal manner and the judge may intervene to ensure that the merits of the case are fairly presented. So if you feel comfortable speaking in front of people and are able to communicate your ideas well, you may decide that it's in your best interests to represent yourself. Content Detail

    By:
    Council Of Magistrate Court Judges
  • The Georgia Court System

    These web pages describe the Georgia court system and provides basic information about the jurisdiction of each of the courts (the kinds of cases each of the different courts may take). Content Detail

    By:
    Georgia Administrative Office of the Courts
  • What are the Rules in Magistrate Court? Basic Rules for Civil Suits - A Short Video Presentation

    As with all the other courts, the party who files an action is responsible for proving her case in Magistrate Court. Content Detail

    By:
    Council Of Magistrate Court Judges
  • What Happens After a Judgment? A Short Video Presentation

    Once a judgment is rendered, either party can appeal that decision within a 30 day period. An appeal from Magistrate Court is transferred to either Superior or State Court, where everything will begin anew, as if the first trial never happened. Content Detail

    By:
    Council Of Magistrate Court Judges
  • What is Magistrate Court? A Short Video Presentation

    Both individuals and businesses can be sued in the Magistrate Court. In 1999, the limit for monetary damages that can be filed was increased from $5,000.00 to $15,000.00. Content Detail

    By:
    Council Of Magistrate Court Judges
  • What Kinds of Cases are not Allowed in Magistrate Court? A Short Video Presentation

    Magistrate courts cannot try individuals charged with a felony or with certain misdemeanor offenses. The Magistrate Court does not have jurisdiction over restraining orders, divorce cases; child custody, child visitation and support cases; cases involving real estate, mental incompetence commitments and equity actions, which involve the rights of parties and seek to direct a person to perform a certain act or to refrain from doing an act. Content Detail

    By:
    Council Of Magistrate Court Judges
  • What Kinds of Cases Can You Bring Before Magistrate Court? A Short Video Presentation

    The Magistrate Court is authorized to hear a variety of civil cases, as long as the claim does not exceed the $15,000.00 limit, including suits on accounts or contracts where a debtor has failed to pay a debt, damages or personal injury claims involving accidents or wrongful conduct, failure to perform on written contracts, personal property foreclosures, garnishments, levies on property to satisfy a judgment and abandoned motor vehicle. Landlord-tenant cases, referred to as dispossessory actions and in some cases distress warrants, are filed against individuals or corporations who remain on a property without the right to do so. These landlord-tenant actions are usually filed for non-payment of rent. Dispossessory actions represent an exception in Magistrate Court where the jurisdictional limit of $15,000.00 does not apply. Content Detail

    By:
    Council Of Magistrate Court Judges

Our Federal Legal System (7)+

  • Changing Our Laws

    This document provides an introduction to how our laws change over time. It discusses how the different sources for the law, including consitutional law, statutory law, and administrative law, are changed. This document is excerpted from An Introduction to Law in Georgia, Fourth Edition, published by the Carl Vinson Institute of Government, 1998 (updated 2004). Read More

    Read this in:
    Spanish / Español
  • Fair Treatment by the Government: Due Process

    When you deal with the government you have the right to be treated fairly and to have a fair process for protecting your rights. These rights are contained in the "Due Process" clauses of the Fifth Amendment and the Fourteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. This document explains more about your rights to fair treatment. The document is an excerpt from An Introduction to Law in Georgia, Fourth Edition, published by the Carl Vinson Institute of Government, 1998 (updated 2004). Read More

    Read this in:
    Spanish / Español
  • The Basics of Litigation

    How litigation works Read More

    By:
    Barnes Law Group
  • The Courts, Part 1: An Overview of Courts and Legal Disputes

    This document discusses why you might need to go to court and what a court is. It also discusses the two general kinds of disputes courts are asked to decide - civil and criminal disputes. This document is excerpted from An Introduction to Law in Georgia, Fourth Edition, published by the Carl Vinson Institute of Government, 1998 (updated 2004). Read More

    Read this in:
    Spanish / Español
  • The Courts, Part 3: How Courts Work and Make Laws

    This document discusses what judges and juries do. It also discusses how courts make and change laws. This document is excerpted from An Introduction to Law in Georgia, Fourth Edition, published by the Carl Vinson Institute of Government, 1998 (updated 2004). Read More

    Read this in:
    Spanish / Español
  • The Courts, Part 2: Which Court Can Hear Your Case?

    This document discusses the two general types of jurisdiction that courts must have in order to have the authority to hear a case. It also explains the Georgia court system and the federal court system. This document is excerpted from An Introduction to Law in Georgia, Fourth Edition, published by the Carl Vinson Institute of Government, 1998 (updated 2004). Read More

    Read this in:
    Spanish / Español
  • Understanding the Federal Courts

    This publication was developed by the Administrative Office of the United States Courts to provide an introduction to the federal judicial system, its organization, and its relationship to the legislative and executive branches of the government. This publication was developed by the Administrative Office of the United States Courts to provide an introduction to the federal judicial system, its organization, and its relationship to the legislative and executive branches of the government. Content Detail

    By:
    Administrative Office of the United States Courts