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Divorce (8)+

  • About Divorce Law in Georgia (Audio/Podcast) audio

    This podcast covers basic legal information about Divorce in Georgia. Mike Monahan, Pro Bono Director of the State Bar of Georgia talks with Vicky Kimbrell, Family Law Specialist Attorney from Georgia Legal Services Program. Visit GLSP.org for Kimbrell's contact information. Read More

    By:
    Georgia Legal Services Program®
  • Basic Marriage and Divorce Law: Ending Marriages

    This document covers basic family law relating to annulments, legal separation, and divorce, including: This document tells you the following: (1) What is an annulment? (2) What are the differences between a legal separation and a divorce? Etc. Read More

    By:
    Carl Vinson Institute
    Read this in:
    Spanish / Español
  • Defenses to A Divorce

    This document lists the defenses to a complaint for divorce. Read More

  • Divorce (Answers to Common Questions)

    This document contains answers to questions many people ask about divorce. Read More

    Read this in:
    Spanish / Español
  • Getting a Divorce in Georgia audio

    This document answers common questions about divorce in Georgia. Read More

    By:
    Georgia Legal Services Program®
    Read this in:
    Spanish / Español
  • How to File an Answer to a Divorce Complaint

    This brochure offers general information about how to properly answer a divorce petition. By filing your own answer, you will ensure that you will receive notice of the final hearing and that you will be able to tell the Court your position whether you decide to hire an attorney or represent yourself. Please be cautioned that the clerk's office of the Superior Court must accept your answer, but the Judge has the authority to require that you hire an attorney. Content Detail

    By:
    Georgia Legal Services Program®
  • How to Get a Divorce

    This document walks you through the process for getting a divorce. If your spouse has ever threatened you, physically harmed you, or you have ever been afraid of your spouse, you should talk to an attorney or call 1-800-33-HAVEN BEFORE you file any divorce forms. You could be in danger and need a plan for your safety. Taking any action to separate or divorce may put you in danger! Read More

  • Modification of a Court Order in a Family Law Case

    This document explains how to modify a court order in a family law case. Read More

Divorce Information with Audio Commentary (9)+

  • About Divorce Law in Georgia (Audio/Podcast) audio

    This podcast covers basic legal information about Divorce in Georgia. Mike Monahan, Pro Bono Director of the State Bar of Georgia talks with Vicky Kimbrell, Family Law Specialist Attorney from Georgia Legal Services Program. Visit GLSP.org for Kimbrell's contact information. Read More

    By:
    Georgia Legal Services Program®
  • Can I get a legal separation?

    In Georgia, you become legally separated from your spouse once you intend to be separated and stop having sexual relations with your spouse. Click link for more information. Read More

  • Can I represent myself in a divorce?

    Yes, you have the right to represent yourself. Some people end up going to court over and over again because they are unaware of certain rules. So, if possible, you should hire a lawyer. Click for more information. Read More

  • Does Georgia recognize common law marriage?

    A common law marriage is a marriage that is created without a marriage license. As of January 1, 1997, new common law marriages cannot be created in Georgia. Click for more information... Read More

  • I have not seen my spouse for years and I do not know where my spouse is. How do I get a divorce?

    You will need to tell the court that you tried to find the defendant. You will sign a sworn statement (affidavit) where you: 1. swear that to the best of your knowledge the whereabouts of your spouse are unknown; 2. swear that you have used reasonable diligence in trying to find out where the defendant is (i.e., you tried hard to find him or her); and 3. State what the last residence of the defendant was. Next, you will file a motion (along with the affidavit) asking for permission to serve/notify the defendant by running an ad in the newspaper (service by publication). Once the Judge gives permission for service by publication, you will publish the notice in the newspaper for four (4) consecutive weeks. If your spouse does not file an answer, the court can grant your divorce as early as 60 days after the first notice ran in the paper. You will have to attend a hearing before the judge can grant your divorce. NOTE: In a divorce by publication, the court cannot award alimony, child support, or property located outside of Georgia. If you lie to the court about your knowledge of your spouse?s whereabouts, the divorce can be overturned later, and you can be prosecuted for perjury. Read More

  • My spouse does not live in Georgia. Can I still get a divorce in Georgia?

    You can get a divorce in Georgia if your spouse lived in Georgia at one time. You will need to do additional reading about Georgia?s ?Domestic Relations Long Arm Statute? to make sure you meet the special requirements in this situation. Read More

  • My spouse has never lived in Georgia. Can I still get a divorce in Georgia?

    You may get a divorce in Georgia if you have lived here for six or more months. However, if the court is unable to get personal jurisdiction over your spouse, the court cannot award alimony, child support, or property in another state. Personal jurisdiction means that there are enough connections between your spouse and the State of Georgia that the Georgia Courts have the power to make decisions that will affect your spouse. It is very hard for a court to get personal jurisdiction over someone who has never lived in the state. This is a complicated situation in which you will need a lawyer. Read More

  • There's nothing to settle; I just want a divorce. Why do I need a settlement agreement in an uncontested divorce?

    In our legal system, the only way to avoid going to trial is to settle out of court. If you have no marital property, the settlement agreement is a way to tell this to the court. If you do not want alimony, you may use the settlement agreement to let the court know of your decision. If you have no debts with your spouse, the settlement agreement notifies the court of this fact. In short, the settlement agreement is your contract regarding the terms of your divorce. If you want an uncontested divorce (without a trial), then you must have a contract (settlement agreement) that handles all of the issues that arise in every divorce. Read More

  • What is no-fault divorce?

    In a no-fault divorce, you need not prove that your spouse did something wrong to get the divorce. No one has to be "at fault". It's enough that you don't want to be married anymore. You can get a divorce even if your spouse does not want a divorce. You may have heard the term irreconcilable differences. In Georgia, the phrase is: "the marriage is irretrievably broken." To get the divorce, you need to claim that there is "no hope of reconciliation" ? that there is no hope that you and your spouse will get back together. Also, you need to be separated from your spouse. Read More

Domestic Violence (1)+

Marriage (3)+

Know Your Rights Articles (11)+

  • Appalachian Circuit Family Law Information Center

    The Appalachian Family Law Information Center (AppFLIC) was developed to help residents of Pickens, Gilmer and Fannin Counties who wish to represent themselves in domestic legal matters or educate themselves about domestic issues. Content Detail

    By:
    Appalachian Circuit Family Law Information Center
  • Clayton County Family Law Information Program Forms

    These forms are for people who want to represent themselved in a family law case in Clayton County Superior Court Read More

  • Fulton County Family Law Information Center - Family Law Forms

    This web site contains forms for use in family law proceedings in the Superior Court of Fulton County, Georgia. Content Detail

  • Northeastern Judicial Circuit Family Law Information Center

    Located on the fourth floor of the Hall County Courthouse (Rooms 459 and 460), the Northeastern Judicial Circuit Family Law Information Center (FLIC) provides assistance to individuals who represent themselves in divorce or legitimation actions (pro se litigants). The Center also has resources and information available for individuals with other related family matters. As with all legal matters, it is strongly recommended that you obtain the services of an attorney. Content Detail

    By:
    Northeastern Judicial Circuit Family Law Information Center
  • Pauper's Affidavit (Request to File without Paying Fees)

    The Pauper's Affidavit, also known as a "pauperis" affidavit, can be filed by very low-income persons to avoid paying filing fees to the court. Usually the judge will review the affidavit and make a decision about whether you have to pay fees or not. If you file this affidavit, you must be ready to respond to the judge about your income. Read More

    By:
    Georgia Legal Services Program®
  • Southern Judicial Circuit Self-help Forms for Pro Se Parties

    The Southern Judicial Circuit covers these 5 counties in Georgia: Brooks, Colquitt, Echols, Lowndes and Thomas Counties. These self-help forms may be used in these 5 counties. The PDF forms cover family law. Content Detail

    By:
    Southern Judicial Circuit
  • There's nothing to settle; I just want a divorce. Why do I need a settlement agreement in an uncontested divorce?

    In our legal system, the only way to avoid going to trial is to settle out of court. If you have no marital property, the settlement agreement is a way to tell this to the court. If you do not want alimony, you may use the settlement agreement to let the court know of your decision. If you have no debts with your spouse, the settlement agreement notifies the court of this fact. In short, the settlement agreement is your contract regarding the terms of your divorce. If you want an uncontested divorce (without a trial), then you must have a contract (settlement agreement) that handles all of the issues that arise in every divorce. Read More

  • Triage Self-help Divorce Questionnaire

    Please take the time to answer these questions as you prepare a self-help ("pro se") divorce. You will need this information to prepare your divorce pleadings and to provide the court all the relevant information. Content Detail

    By:
    Georgia Legal Services Program®
  • Vital Records Divorce Form 3907

    The Vital Records Branch of the Division of Public Health, Georgia Department of Human Resources requires everyone who files divorce actions to accompany their petitions for divorce with the Vital Records form (known as the "Gray Sheet" in years past), Form 3907. All new divorce petitions MUST be filed with the courts using this new form. Content Detail

    By:
    Vital Records Branch of the Division of Public Health, Georgia Department of Human Resources
  • What is no-fault divorce?

    In a no-fault divorce, you need not prove that your spouse did something wrong to get the divorce. No one has to be "at fault". It's enough that you don't want to be married anymore. You can get a divorce even if your spouse does not want a divorce. You may have heard the term irreconcilable differences. In Georgia, the phrase is: "the marriage is irretrievably broken." To get the divorce, you need to claim that there is "no hope of reconciliation" ? that there is no hope that you and your spouse will get back together. Also, you need to be separated from your spouse. Read More

  • What to Do if You Are Sued

    This video provides basic information about what to do if you are sued. It briefly reviews the paperwork involved in a lawsuit and the different ways a case can be resolved. Read More