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Childcare Resources (3)+

Public and Other Benefits (2)+

Know Your Rights Articles (4)+

  • Child and Dependent Care Credit

    If you paid someone to care for a child or a dependent so you could work, you may be able to reduce your tax by claiming the credit for child and dependent care expenses on your federal income tax return, according to the IRS. Content Detail

    By:
    Internal Revenue Service
  • Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA)

    The Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) provides certain employees with up to 12 weeks of unpaid, job-protected leave per year. It also requires that their group health benefits be maintained during the leave. FMLA is designed to help employees balance their work and family responsibilities by allowing them to take reasonable unpaid leave for certain family and medical reasons. It also seeks to accommodate the legitimate interests of employers and promote equal employment opportunity for men and women. This web page contains information and links to: (1) laws and regulations, (2) facts sheets, (3) compliance guides for employers, (4) answers to common questions about the FMLA, and much more. Content Detail

    By:
    U.S. Department of Labor
    Read this in:
    Spanish / Español
  • Pauper's Affidavit (Request to File without Paying Fees)

    The Pauper's Affidavit, also known as a "pauperis" affidavit, can be filed by very low-income persons to avoid paying filing fees to the court. Usually the judge will review the affidavit and make a decision about whether you have to pay fees or not. If you file this affidavit, you must be ready to respond to the judge about your income. Read More

    By:
    Georgia Legal Services Program®
  • Subsidized Child Care - Children and Parent Services (CAPS) Program

    The State of Georgia’s Childcare and Parent Services (CAPS) program helps Georgia families pay for early childhood and school age care programs. Subsidized care is available for children from age birth to age 13, or up to age 18 if the child has special needs. Content Detail

    By:
    Georgia Division of Family and Children Services