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Privacy (7)+

  • Additional Constitutional Protections: Voting, Privacy, Bearing Arms

    This document provides a brief overview of certain additional rights under the US Constitution, answering the following questions: What constitutional rights are there besides those in the First Amendment? Is there a right to bear arms? Is there a right to privacy? Is there a right to vote? What do some of the amendments in the Bill of Rights say? The document is excerpted from An Introduction to Law in Georgia, Fourth Edition, published by the Carl Vinson Institute of Government, 1998 (updated 2004). Read More

    By:
    Carl Vinson Institute
    Read this in:
    Spanish / Español
  • Consumer Privacy Issues - FTC Web Site

    Advances in computer technology have made it possible for detailed information about people to be compiled and shared more easily and cheaply than ever. That's good for society as a whole and individual consumers. For example, it is easier for law enforcement to track down criminals, for banks to prevent fraud, and for consumers to learn about new products and services, allowing them to make better-informed purchasing decisions. At the same time, as personal information becomes more accessible, each of us - companies, associations, government agencies, and consumers - must take precautions to protect against the misuse of that information. The Federal Trade Commission is educating consumers and businesses about the importance of personal information privacy. Read more about our efforts, what we've learned, and what you can do to protect the privacy of your personal information. Content Detail

    By:
    Federal Trade Commission
    Read this in:
    Spanish / Español
  • Drug Testing and Privacy at Work

    This document discusses the basic employment laws relating to drug testing and privacy at work, excerpted from An Introduction to Law in Georgia, Fourth Edition, published by the Carl Vinson Institute of Government, 1998 (updated 2004). Read More

    By:
    Carl Vinson Institute
    Read this in:
    Spanish / Español
  • Guide to On-Line Privacy

    This document provides detailed information about privacy rights through the Constitution, legislation and agency inititiatives, legislation before Congress, and resources for protecting your medical, financial, and other information. Content Detail

    By:
    Center for Democracy and Technology
  • Privacy Rights

    This resource provides links to several different websites that address privacy rights and protecting personal information. Read More

  • Privacy: Tips for Protecting Your Personal Information

    Every day you share personal information about yourself with others. It's so routine that you may not even realize you're doing it. You may write a check at the grocery store, charge tickets to a ball game, rent a car, mail your tax returns, buy a gift online, call home on your cell phone, schedule a doctor's appointment or apply for a credit card. Each transaction requires you to share personal information: your bank and credit card account numbers; your income; your Social Security number (SSN); or your name, address and phone numbers. Content Detail

    By:
    The Federal Trade Commission
  • The Privacy Rights Clearinghouse

    The Privacy Rights Clearinghouse (PRC) is a nonprofit consumer organization with a two-part mission -- consumer information and consumer advocacy. It was established in 1992 and is based in San Diego, California. It is primarily grant-supported and serves individuals nationwide. The PRC's goals are to: Raise consumers' awareness of how technology affects personal privacy. Empower consumers to take action to control their own personal information by providing practical tips on privacy protection. Respond to specific privacy-related complaints from consumers, intercede on their behalf, and, when appropriate, refer them to the proper organizations for further assistance. Document the nature of consumers' complaints and questions about privacy in reports, testimony, and speeches and make them available to policy makers, industry representatives, consumer advocates, and the media. Advocate for consumers' privacy rights in local, state, and federal public policy proceedings, including legislative testimony, regulatory agency hearings, task forces, and study commissions as well as conferences and workshops. Content Detail

    By:
    The Privacy Rights Clearinghouse

Know Your Rights Articles (6)+

  • Additional Constitutional Protections: Voting, Privacy, Bearing Arms

    This document provides a brief overview of certain additional rights under the US Constitution, answering the following questions: What constitutional rights are there besides those in the First Amendment? Is there a right to bear arms? Is there a right to privacy? Is there a right to vote? What do some of the amendments in the Bill of Rights say? The document is excerpted from An Introduction to Law in Georgia, Fourth Edition, published by the Carl Vinson Institute of Government, 1998 (updated 2004). Read More

    By:
    Carl Vinson Institute
    Read this in:
    Spanish / Español
  • Consumer Fraud and Abuse Protection for Seniors

    People of all ages constantly purchase goods and services -- houses, cars, clothing, personal services, medical care, food, and so on. Being a knowledgeable consumer has a positive impact on one's economic well-being. While most companies and businesses are legitimate, some are unscrupulous. It's estimated that telemarketing fraud costs Americans $40 billion a year and Georgians about $500 million a year. In addition to telemarketing fraud, there are scams and swindles connected to home repairs, contests and sweepstakes, charity drives, investment offers, insurance, and health care. Many of these scams are targeted to older adults. In Georgia the Department of Law's Consumer Protection Unit and the Secretary of State's office provide protection for Georgia consumers against telemarketing and other types of consumer fraud. Read More

  • Consumer Privacy Issues - FTC Web Site

    Advances in computer technology have made it possible for detailed information about people to be compiled and shared more easily and cheaply than ever. That's good for society as a whole and individual consumers. For example, it is easier for law enforcement to track down criminals, for banks to prevent fraud, and for consumers to learn about new products and services, allowing them to make better-informed purchasing decisions. At the same time, as personal information becomes more accessible, each of us - companies, associations, government agencies, and consumers - must take precautions to protect against the misuse of that information. The Federal Trade Commission is educating consumers and businesses about the importance of personal information privacy. Read more about our efforts, what we've learned, and what you can do to protect the privacy of your personal information. Content Detail

    By:
    Federal Trade Commission
    Read this in:
    Spanish / Español
  • Drug Testing and Privacy at Work

    This document discusses the basic employment laws relating to drug testing and privacy at work, excerpted from An Introduction to Law in Georgia, Fourth Edition, published by the Carl Vinson Institute of Government, 1998 (updated 2004). Read More

    By:
    Carl Vinson Institute
    Read this in:
    Spanish / Español
  • Guide to On-Line Privacy

    This document provides detailed information about privacy rights through the Constitution, legislation and agency inititiatives, legislation before Congress, and resources for protecting your medical, financial, and other information. Content Detail

    By:
    Center for Democracy and Technology
  • Tax Scams/Consumer Alerts

    Don't fall victim to tax scams. Remember that if it sounds too good to be true, it probably is. If you think you're being scammed, you can report suspected tax fraud activity by calling 1-800-829-0433. Content Detail

    By:
    Internal Revenue Service

Fraud (5)+

  • Be on the Alert against Fraud

    The FTC, the nation's consumer protection agency, works for the consumer to prevent fraudulent, deceptive and unfair business practices in the marketplace and provides information to help consumers spot, stop and avoid them. Content Detail

    By:
    Federal Trade Commission
    Read this in:
    Spanish / Español
  • Consumer Fraud and Abuse Protection for Seniors

    People of all ages constantly purchase goods and services -- houses, cars, clothing, personal services, medical care, food, and so on. Being a knowledgeable consumer has a positive impact on one's economic well-being. While most companies and businesses are legitimate, some are unscrupulous. It's estimated that telemarketing fraud costs Americans $40 billion a year and Georgians about $500 million a year. In addition to telemarketing fraud, there are scams and swindles connected to home repairs, contests and sweepstakes, charity drives, investment offers, insurance, and health care. Many of these scams are targeted to older adults. In Georgia the Department of Law's Consumer Protection Unit and the Secretary of State's office provide protection for Georgia consumers against telemarketing and other types of consumer fraud. Read More

  • Fraud

    This resource provides links to several different websites that help with spotting, stopping, and avoiding different types of fraud. Read More

  • Scholarship Scams

    Unfortunately, in their efforts to pay the bills, many students and their families are falling prey to scholarship scams. Take a look at this FTC web page for common scams. File a complaint if you've been scammed. Content Detail

    By:
    Federal Trade Commission
    Read this in:
    Spanish / Español
  • Tax Scams/Consumer Alerts

    Don't fall victim to tax scams. Remember that if it sounds too good to be true, it probably is. If you think you're being scammed, you can report suspected tax fraud activity by calling 1-800-829-0433. Content Detail

    By:
    Internal Revenue Service

Identity Theft (2)+

  • Identity Theft and Your Social Security Number

    Identity theft is one of the fastest growing crimes in America. When a dishonest person has your Social Security number, the thief can use it to get other personal information about you. Most of the time identity thieves use your number and your good credit to apply for more credit in your name. Then, they use the credit cards and do not pay the bills. You do not find out that someone is using your number until you are turned down for credit, or you begin to get calls from unknown creditors demanding payment for items you never bought. Content Detail

    By:
    Social Security Administration
    Read this in:
    Spanish / Español
    Russian / Pусский
    Chinese / 中文
  • Protect Yourself from Identity Theft

    Here you will find forms you can fill out online, print and send to help you with identity theft problems you may have. Read More

    By:
    National Identity Theft Victims Assistance Network