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Brochures

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  • Documents Generally Required for School Enrollment in Georgia

    Schools in Georgia will ask you for specific documents to enroll your child. Learn about the kinds of documents they may ask for. Learn what kinds of documents you may be able to present if you do not have what the school asks for. Content Detail

    By:
    Georgia Legal Services Program®
    Read this in:
    Spanish / Español
  • Does Georgia recognize common law marriage?

    A common law marriage is a marriage that is created without a marriage license. As of January 1, 1997, new common law marriages cannot be created in Georgia. Click for more information... Content Detail

  • Do You Have Student Loans and You're Receiving Social Security Benefits?

    DO YOU RECEIVE SOCIAL SECURITY DISABILITY BENEFITS? Has Social Security determined your Medical Improvement is Not Expected (“MINE”)? If you answered yes to either question, then you MAY be eligible to have your Student Loan Debt FORGIVEN. YOUR LOAN TYPE MUST BE ONE OF THE FOLLOWING: • William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program • Federal Family Education Loan Program (FFEL) • Federal Perkins Loan Program • TEACH Grant Service obligation Read More

    By:
    Georgia Legal Services Program®
  • Facing Foreclosure?

    This flyer gives gives basic information on the foreclosure process in Georgia. Read More

    By:
    Atlanta Legal Aid Society, Inc.
  • Help for Domestic Violence Victims Living in Federally Subsidized or Public Housing

    This video reviews various situations in which the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) will protect victims of domestic violence who live in federally subsidized or public housing. Read More

    By:
    Atlanta Legal Aid Society, Inc.
  • Housing Codes

    This document provides basic information on city and county housing codes that set the rules for basic upkeep and maintenance for decent housing. Read More

    By:
    GeorgiaLegalAid.org
    Read this in:
    Spanish / Español
  • How to answer a dispossessory

    This document provides information on how to answer a dispossessory warrant.  Read More

    By:
    Georgia Legal Services Program®
  • How to answer an eviction warrant

    This document provides information how to answer an eviction/dispossessory warrant. Read More

    Read this in:
    Spanish / Español
  • How to appeal from a magistrate court dispossessory

    This document describes the appeal process and its requirements if you lose a magistrate court dispossessory case. Read More

    By:
    Georgia Legal Services Program®
  • How to Avoid Foreclosure and Keep Your Home

    This document provides ten (10) important steps to take if you have fallen behind in your home mortgage payments. Read More

  • How to Get a Temporary Protective Order

    A temporary protective order (TPO) is a document issued by a court to help protect you from someone who is abusing, threatening or harassing you. The order will require the abuser to stay a certain distance away from you, your home and your work. The abuser will be prohibited from contacting you in person, by email, by telephone, by mail and through a third party. The court can also order the abuser to stay away from your children if the court feels the abuser poses a risk to your children. This document will walk you through the process for getting a Temporary Protective Order from the court. Read More

    Read this in:
    Spanish / Español
  • If You Lose Your Job

    This brochure will give you information on unemployment benefits, unemployment insurance appeals and ideas about other ways to replace lost income while you look for another job or wait for your unemployment benefits. Content Detail

    By:
    Georgia Legal Services Program®
  • I have not seen my spouse for years and I do not know where my spouse is. How do I get a divorce?

    You will need to tell the court that you tried to find the defendant. You will sign a sworn statement (affidavit) where you: 1. swear that to the best of your knowledge the whereabouts of your spouse are unknown; 2. swear that you have used reasonable diligence in trying to find out where the defendant is (i.e., you tried hard to find him or her); and 3. State what the last residence of the defendant was. Next, you will file a motion (along with the affidavit) asking for permission to serve/notify the defendant by running an ad in the newspaper (service by publication). Once the Judge gives permission for service by publication, you will publish the notice in the newspaper for four (4) consecutive weeks. If your spouse does not file an answer, the court can grant your divorce as early as 60 days after the first notice ran in the paper. You will have to attend a hearing before the judge can grant your divorce. NOTE: In a divorce by publication, the court cannot award alimony, child support, or property located outside of Georgia. If you lie to the court about your knowledge of your spouse?s whereabouts, the divorce can be overturned later, and you can be prosecuted for perjury. Content Detail

  • Kinship Care: Legal Relationships and Public Benefits Guide

    Information for relative caregivers adopting children including definitions of benefits and adoption Read More

  • Mediation and Domestic Violence

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    By:
    Georgia Legal Services Program®