GeorgiaGeorgia

Privacy and Identity Theft

Know Your Rights

  • Learn about All the New Telephone Scams - Don't Become a Victim

    Crooks use clever schemes to defraud millions of people every year. They often combine sophisticated technology with age-old tricks to get people to send money or give out personal information. They add new twists to old schemes and pressure people to make important decisions on the spot. One thing that never changes: they follow the headlines — and the money. Stay a step ahead with the latest info and practical tips from the nation’s consumer protection agency. Browse FTC scam alerts by topic or by most recent. Content Detail

    By:
    Federal Trade Commission (FTC)
  • Ways to receive your money (Wages or Payments)

    Have you received a paycheck but aren’t sure whether to cash it or put it into a bank account? This guide provides information about receiving wages or payments. You can use this guide to compare the benefits and risks of getting paid in cash, with a check, by direct deposit, or on a card. Content Detail

    By:
    Federal Trade Commission (FTC)
    Read this in:
    Spanish / Español
  • Georgia Consumer's Guide to Identity Theft

    We have become an information society. With the right information, a scam artist can access your credit card, your checking account, and even your savings account and use them as if the accounts were his own. When a person steals information about you, whether he uses that information to take your money or not, he has committed a crime against you. Identity theft is the act of "stealing" or using another person’s personal and/or financial information for personal gain. Personal and financial information includes your driver's license number, social security number, credit card number, bank account information, personal identification number (PIN) for Automatic Teller Machines (ATM) and calling cards, date of birth and even your mother's maiden name. Content Detail

    By:
    Governor's Office of Consumer Affairs
  • Identity Theft and Your Social Security Number

    Identity theft is one of the fastest growing crimes in America. When a dishonest person has your Social Security number, the thief can use it to get other personal information about you. Most of the time identity thieves use your number and your good credit to apply for more credit in your name. Then, they use the credit cards and do not pay the bills. You do not find out that someone is using your number until you are turned down for credit, or you begin to get calls from unknown creditors demanding payment for items you never bought. Content Detail

    By:
    Social Security Administration
    Read this in:
    Spanish / Español
    Russian / Pусский
    Chinese / 中文
  • Tech Savvy Teens: Choosing Who Gets to See Your Info PDF

    Produced by the NNEDV Safety Net Project, this flyer will teach your teen how to protect their identity online. Content Detail

    By:
    Atlanta Legal Aid Society Inc
    Read this in:
    Spanish / Español
  • Consumer Privacy Issues - FTC Web Site

    Advances in computer technology have made it possible for detailed information about people to be compiled and shared more easily and cheaply than ever. That's good for society as a whole and individual consumers. For example, it is easier for law enforcement to track down criminals, for banks to prevent fraud, and for consumers to learn about new products and services, allowing them to make better-informed purchasing decisions. At the same time, as personal information becomes more accessible, each of us - companies, associations, government agencies, and consumers - must take precautions to protect against the misuse of that information. The Federal Trade Commission is educating consumers and businesses about the importance of personal information privacy. Read more about our efforts, what we've learned, and what you can do to protect the privacy of your personal information. Content Detail

    By:
    Federal Trade Commission
    Read this in:
    Spanish / Español
  • Learn about Personal Finances and Using Credit

    This presentation was developed as part of the Law and Government Education Project in the Institute of Government at the University of Georgia. In partnership with the Law School and the Center for Teaching and Learning at UGA and the Law School at Mercer University, the Institute develops resources on basic areas of Georgia and federal law. These resources are then distributed across the state in a variety of ways including the State Bar of Georgia?s Pro Bono Project website. We hope you will find this presentation to be useful and informative. Please be advised, however, that this presentation is designed to provide general information only and does not substitute for legal advice. At the conclusion of the presentation you will find a list of organizations which may be able to provide assistance to those who have legal issues relevant to the topic of this presentation. We encourage viewers to contact these organizations for help. Also, please consult the Pro Bono Project website for a list of other presentations available for viewing. Content Detail

    By:
    Carl Vinson Institute of Government, University of Georgia
    Read this in:
    Spanish / Español
  • Consumer Law: Legal Issues on the Internet

    The Internet has become ubiquitous in American life. It raises number of consumer-protection issues that can be addressed here. Content Detail

    By:
    American Bar Association
  • Identity Theft

    How can someone steal your identity? Identity theft occurs when someone uses your personal information such as your name, Social Security number, credit card number or other identifying information, without your permission to commit fraud or other crimes. Identity theft is a serious crime. People whose identities have been stolen can spend months or years - and their hard-earned money - cleaning up the mess thieves have made of their good name and credit record. In the meantime, victims may lose job opportunities, are refused loans, education, housing or cars, or even get arrested for crimes they didn't commit. Content Detail

    By:
    Federal Trade Commission
    Read this in:
    Spanish / Español
  • Privacy: Tips for Protecting Your Personal Information

    Every day you share personal information about yourself with others. It's so routine that you may not even realize you're doing it. You may write a check at the grocery store, charge tickets to a ball game, rent a car, mail your tax returns, buy a gift online, call home on your cell phone, schedule a doctor's appointment or apply for a credit card. Each transaction requires you to share personal information: your bank and credit card account numbers; your income; your Social Security number (SSN); or your name, address and phone numbers. Content Detail

    By:
    The Federal Trade Commission
  • The Privacy Rights Clearinghouse

    The Privacy Rights Clearinghouse (PRC) is a nonprofit consumer organization with a two-part mission -- consumer information and consumer advocacy. It was established in 1992 and is based in San Diego, California. It is primarily grant-supported and serves individuals nationwide. The PRC's goals are to: Raise consumers' awareness of how technology affects personal privacy. Empower consumers to take action to control their own personal information by providing practical tips on privacy protection. Respond to specific privacy-related complaints from consumers, intercede on their behalf, and, when appropriate, refer them to the proper organizations for further assistance. Document the nature of consumers' complaints and questions about privacy in reports, testimony, and speeches and make them available to policy makers, industry representatives, consumer advocates, and the media. Advocate for consumers' privacy rights in local, state, and federal public policy proceedings, including legislative testimony, regulatory agency hearings, task forces, and study commissions as well as conferences and workshops. Content Detail

    By:
    The Privacy Rights Clearinghouse
  • Steps YOU can take to protect yourself as a consumer!

    10 steps you can take to avoid getting ripped off. Content Detail

    By:
    Stopfakes.gov
  • Your Social Security Number and Card

    Frequently asked questions about your Social Security number and card. Content Detail

    By:
    Social Security Administration
    Read this in:
    Spanish / Español
    Chinese / 中文