Georgia

Your Government: Representing Yourself in Court

Know Your Rights

  • How Civil Lawsuits Work: After the Trial

    This document describes the basic process of what happens after a civil law suit ends. The document has been excerpted from An Introduction to Law in Georgia, Fourth Edition, published by the Carl Vinson Institute of Government, 1998 (updated 2004). Read More

    By:
    Carl Vinson Institute of Government, University of Georgia
    Read this in:
    Spanish / Español
  • How Civil Lawsuits Work: Before the Trial

    This document describes the basic process for what happens before the trial in a civil law suit. The document has been excerpted from An Introduction to Law in Georgia, Fourth Edition, published by the Carl Vinson Institute of Government, 1998 (updated 2004). Read More

    By:
    Carl Vinson Institute of Government, University of Georgia
    Read this in:
    Spanish / Español
  • How Courts Work in Civil Cases

    This pamphlet describes step by step how courts work in civil cases (filing the complaint or petition, serving the complaint on the defendant, filing an answer, discovery and collection of evidence, hearing or trial, court decision, appeal and collection of judgment). Read More

    By:
    Atlanta Legal Aid Society Inc
  • Civil Court Cases

    This web page explains the process for a civil court case and describes some of the documents and concepts that are involved in the process, including : (1) the complaint or petition, (2) serving the complaint or petition on the opposing party, (3) use of blank or standard forms, (3) jurisdiction, (4) answering the complaint or petition, (5) hiring an attorney, (6) getting free or reduced-cost legal assistance, (7) getting a waiver of court costs, (8) trial calendars, (9) witnesses, (10) getting a continuance (a delay in the court case), and (11) the final judgment or final order. Content Detail

    By:
    Georgia Administrative Office of the Courts
  • How Civil Lawsuits Work: The Trial

    This document describes the basic process of what happens during a civil law suit. The document has been excerpted from An Introduction to Law in Georgia, Third Edition, published by the Carl Vinson Institute of Government, 1998 (updated 2001). Read More

    By:
    Carl Vinson Institute of Government, University of Georgia
    Read this in:
    Spanish / Español
  • How to Be a Good Witness - State Bar of Georgia Consumer Pamphlet

    You have a very important job to do as a witness in a lawsuit. Your role is not only important to the party for whom you appear and yourself, but also for the American system of justice. For a jury or judge to make a correct and wise decision, they must decide on facts stated by witnesses who have sworn to tell the truth. Understanding what you are expected to do and how to do it will ease your anxiety and make you a better witness. Content Detail

    By:
    State Bar of Georgia
  • The Courts, Part 1: An Overview of Courts and Legal Disputes

    This document discusses why you might need to go to court and what a court is. It also discusses the two general kinds of disputes courts are asked to decide - civil and criminal disputes. This document is excerpted from An Introduction to Law in Georgia, Fourth Edition, published by the Carl Vinson Institute of Government, 1998 (updated 2004). Read More

    By:
    Carl Vinson Institute of Government, University of Georgia
    Read this in:
    Spanish / Español
  • Understanding the Federal Courts

    This publication was developed by the Administrative Office of the United States Courts to provide an introduction to the federal judicial system, its organization, and its relationship to the legislative and executive branches of the government. This publication was developed by the Administrative Office of the United States Courts to provide an introduction to the federal judicial system, its organization, and its relationship to the legislative and executive branches of the government. Content Detail

    By:
    Administrative Office of the United States Courts
  • Georgia Court Rules

    These web pages provide the court rules for the following Georgia Courts: Supreme Court, Court of Appeals, Superior Court, State Court, Juvenile Court, Probate Court, and Magistrate Court Content Detail

    By:
    Georgia Administrative Office of the Courts
  • The Courts, Part 3: How Courts Work and Make Laws

    This document discusses what judges and juries do. It also discusses how courts make and change laws. This document is excerpted from An Introduction to Law in Georgia, Fourth Edition, published by the Carl Vinson Institute of Government, 1998 (updated 2004). Read More

    By:
    Carl Vinson Institute of Government, University of Georgia
    Read this in:
    Spanish / Español
  • The Courts, Part 2: Which Court Can Hear Your Case?

    This document discusses the two general types of jurisdiction that courts must have in order to have the authority to hear a case. It also explains the Georgia court system and the federal court system. This document is excerpted from An Introduction to Law in Georgia, Fourth Edition, published by the Carl Vinson Institute of Government, 1998 (updated 2004). Read More

    By:
    Carl Vinson Institute of Government, University of Georgia
    Read this in:
    Spanish / Español
  • A Citizens's Guide to Filing Appeals in the Court of Appeals of Georgia

    This web site is a guide to assist parties who are representing themselves without the help of a lawyer with the basic procedural steps that must be followed in filing appeals to the Court of Appeals of Georgia. The web site answers common questions and provides forms for parties who are representing themselves in court without the help of a lawyer. Content Detail

    By:
    Court of Appeals of Georgia
  • Georgia Consumer's Guide to the Magistrate Court

    If you have been unable to resolve a dispute with a person or a business, you may take your problem to Magistrate's Court. Magistrate's Court, also called Small Claims Court, is an informal court that handles money claims for less than $15,000.00. This court offers a quick and inexpensive process for complaint resolution. Content Detail

    By:
    Governor's Office of Consumer Affairs
  • How to Sue in Magistrate Court PDF

    Magistrate Courts let you sue for money claims under $15,000 (fifteen thousand dollars). A Magistrate Judge decides your case after a trial. There is no jury. You do not need a lawyer. However, you may seek help from a lawyer. Content Detail

    By:
    Atlanta Legal Aid Society Inc
    Read this in:
    Spanish / Español
  • Learn about Civil Justice and the Legal System

    This presentation was developed as part of the Law and Government Education Project in the Institute of Government at the University of Georgia. In partnership with the Law School and the Center for Teaching and Learning at UGA and the Law School at Mercer University, the Institute develops resources on basic areas of Georgia and federal law. These resources are then distributed across the state in a variety of ways including the State Bar of Georgia?s Pro Bono Project website. We hope you will find this presentation to be useful and informative. Please be advised, however, that this presentation is designed to provide general information only and does not substitute for legal advice. At the conclusion of the presentation you will find a list of organizations which may be able to provide assistance to those who have legal issues relevant to the topic of this presentation. We encourage viewers to contact these organizations for help. Also, please consult the Pro Bono Project website for a list of other presentations available for viewing. Content Detail

    By:
    Carl Vinson Institute of Government, University of Georgia
    Read this in:
    Spanish / Español