Georgia

Personal Injury: Accidental Harm to People or Property (Negligence)

Know Your Rights

  • U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission Web Site

    CPSC is an Independent Federal Regulatory Agency. CPSC works to save lives and keep families safe by reducing the risk of injuries and deaths associated with consumer products. We do this by: (1) developing voluntary standards with industry, (2) issuing and enforcing mandatory standards or banning consumer products if no feasible standard would adequately protect the public, (3) obtaining the recall of products or arranging for their repair, (4) conducting research on potential product hazards, (5) informing and educating consumers through the media, state and local governments, private organizations, and by responding to consumer inquiries. Content Detail

    By:
    U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission
    Read this in:
    Spanish / Español
  • Defenses to a Lawsuit for Accidents and Injuries

    This document describes the basic defenses to tort claims (harm caused by negligence or by intentional actions). The document is an excerpt from An Introduction to Law in Georgia, Fourth Edition, published by the Carl Vinson Institute of Government, 1998 (updated 2004). Read More

    By:
    Carl Vinson Institute of Government, University of Georgia
    Read this in:
    Spanish / Español
  • Liability Insurance

    The liability portion of your homeowner's policy is designed to cover unintentional injuries on the premises and unintentional damage to other people's property. In other words, injuries caused by your negligence are covered; those you inflict on purpose are not covered. Here are a few tips on how to cover yourself adequately. Remember, it takes only one person who is seriously injured by your negligence to generate a huge liability award and deplete your financial nest egg, not to mention your psychological well being. Content Detail

    By:
    American Bar Association
  • The Georgia Negligence Jury

    This web page contains statistics about judges and juries that decide cases about accidental injuries to people or property (negligence cases). The information is based on surveys of judges and juries in Georgia over a period of three years. Judges and juries frequently agree on who ought to win a case. Citizens perform jury service in an un-distracted and highly conscientious fashion. Juries hear only a small portion of the total number of negligence controversies. The jury is not more likely than the judge to find for the plaintiff The jury largely comprehends even complicated negligence cases. The jury generally follows the judge's instructions on the law of the case. Judges and attorneys adamantly oppose the abolition of the negligence jury. Content Detail

    By:
    Georgia Civil Justice Foundation
  • The Law and Your Home: Avoiding Liability for Accidents

    You might be legally liable if someone has an accident in your home. Did your negligence or carelessness contribute to an accident or injury? Pitfalls include someone slipping and falling on an icy sidewalk, and accidents involving power lawn mowers, swimming pools, boats, and other recreational vehicles. The best way to avoid liability is to prevent injuries on your property in the first place and protect yourself with a solid insurance policy in the event the unavoidable and unexpected does occur. This web site contains more information on how you can keep your home safe and protect yourself from liability. Content Detail

    By:
    American Bar Association
  • When You Harm Others by Accident

    This document describes legal claims that people may have when they are injured because of someone accidentally hurting or harming them. These claims are based on theories of "negligence". The document also contains information about defenses to those claims. The document is excerpted from An Introduction to Law in Georgia, Fourth Edition, published by the Carl Vinson Institute of Government, 1998 (updated 2004). Read More

    By:
    Carl Vinson Institute of Government, University of Georgia
    Read this in:
    Spanish / Español
  • Regulating Product Safety in Georgia

    This document contains information on product safety laws in Georgia, and answers the following questions: What two types of laws relate to product safety? What is product liability? What are some examples of federal laws concerned with public safety? What are some of the agencies that work to protect consumer safety and what areas do these agencies cover? What is Georgia's "lemon law"? The document is excerpted from An Introduction to Law in Georgia, Fourth Edition, published by the Carl Vinson Institute of Government, 1998 (updated 2004). Read More

    By:
    Carl Vinson Institute of Government, University of Georgia
    Read this in:
    Spanish / Español