Georgia

Children's Civil Rights

Know Your Rights

  • Advocating for Your Child's Education

    This manual provides you with information about the laws that may be useful to you as you advocate for your child’s right to a free and appropriate public education. Content Detail

    By:
    National Center for Learning Disabilities
    Read this in:
    Spanish / Español
  • Georgia's Toll-Free School Safety Hotline

    Mission of Georgia's School Safety Program: To provide a safe and secure school environment conducive to learning with the cooperation of students, parents, teachers, school administrators, and the community. The Toll-free School Safety Hotline: 1-877-SAY-STOP On August 14, 1998 the Georgia Department of Education announced the arrival of Georgia's toll-free, anonymous 1-877-SAY-STOP (1-877-729-7867) school safety hotline. 1-877-SAY-STOP is the nation's first state-sponsored school safety hotline and is one example of the Georgia Safety and Violence Task Force's accomplishments. Content Detail

    By:
    Georgia Department of Education
  • Rules of the State Board of Education

    This web site contains the existing and proposed rules for the State Board of Education for the State of Georgia. Content Detail

    By:
    Georgia Department of Education
  • When your Child is Missing: A Family Survival Guide

    This Guide was written by parents and family members who have experienced the disappearance of a child. It contains their combined advice concerning what you can expect when your child is missing, what you can do, and where you can go for help. It explains the role that various agencies and organizations play in the search for your missing child and discusses some of the important issues that you and your family need to consider. The first checklist, What You Should Do When Your Child Is First Missing, summarizes the most critical steps that parents should take when their child is first missing, including whom to call, what to do to preserve evidence, and where to turn for help. Content Detail

    By:
    Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention
    Read this in:
    Spanish / Español
  • Civil Rights about Education

    This site provides answers to frequently asked questions about civil rights and education. Content Detail

    By:
    U.S. Department of Justice
    Read this in:
    Spanish / Español
  • The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act and Children with Diabetes

    The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, known as "IDEA," is a federal law that requires states to provide a "free, appropriate public education" to children with disabilities so that they can be educated to the greatest extent possible along with all other children. Qualifying children are entitled to special education and related services at no cost to their parents. This web site provides more information. Content Detail

    By:
    Disability Rights Education and Defense Fund
  • Juvenile Court Glossary of Terms

    This document contains a list of terms frequently used in juvenile court case and their definitions. Content Detail

    By:
    Cobb County Juvenile Court
  • Rights and Responsibilities of Parents and Students in Public Schools PDF

    One of the most important things you can do for your children is to be involved in their education. You need to know the school principal and your child's teachers, so you can discuss your child's progress. You need to know the school's rules and what the school expects from parents and students. You also need to know the school's procedures and your rights in case a problem arises. This document discusses those rights and procedures. Content Detail

    By:
    Atlanta Legal Aid Society Inc
    Read this in:
    Spanish / Español
  • The Juvenile Criminal System

    The juvenile court system is set up to guide and rehabilitate young people. It’s similar to the adult system, but with important variations. These web pages contain more information about rights and the process used in the juvenile court system. Content Detail

    By:
    American Bar Association
  • Your Guide to the Court System in Georgia

    Handbook developed by the Southern Center for Human Rights to guide you through the courts (including the juvenile justice system) in Georgia Read More

    By:
    Southern Center for Human Rights
  • Emancipation of Minors

    Emancipation allows a minor to make medical, financial and housing decisions. An emancipated minor can do many things without his or her parent's consent, such as sign leases, apply for public benefits, register for school, and apply for a driver's license. Emancipation also means that the minor's parents are no longer obligated to provide financial support. Read More

    By:
    Atlanta Legal Aid Society Inc
  • No Child Left Behind

    No Child Left Behind is designed to change the culture of America's schools by closing the achievement gap, offering more flexibility, giving parents more options, and teaching students based on what works. Under the act's accountability provisions, states must describe how they will close the achievement gap and make sure all students, including those who are disadvantaged, achieve academic proficiency. They must produce annual state and school district report cards that inform parents and communities about state and school progress. Schools that do not make progress must provide supplemental services, such as free tutoring or after-school assistance; take corrective actions; and, if still not making adequate yearly progress after five years, make dramatic changes to the way the school is run. Content Detail

    By:
    Georgia Department of Education
    Read this in:
    Spanish / Español